A Fascinating Duck Goes Bonkers!

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by JGKipp

What can be so fascinating about a duck?

A most interesting duck met me today!

She looked average, an every day, garden-variety duck.  She had a

  • wide body;
  • not fat,
  • not skinny,
  • looked just right to me. 

probably weighed ten to fifteen pounds. Shades of brown with green and white feathers around her long neck and a large head graced her body. All of this made her a very interesting duck.

She had to be a duck. I’d seen pictures of ducks and this duck looked identical to them.  At the zoo were many ducksMy family had been there with me

It wasn’t too surprising to see her.  She was at the right place, where lots of ducks gather. 

You could be thinking, “Why are you telling me this?”

You also might wonder why I keep calling duck ‘she.’ Don’t know an answer to that, this duck just looked like a she. And…

She acted strangely, that’s why.  She kept looking back and forth toward the lake and me, while quacking wildly!

Hi there Duck,” I called cheerfully, with a wide grin on my face.  I thought it would make her happy if I looked happy.

Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack,” she quackily replied loudly!

You seem upset.  Are you all right? I asked.

“Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack, quack,” she responded.  Again, she kept looking at the lake and back to me.

Whatever’s wrong must be by or in the lake,” I thought.  “Come on, Duck, let’s go see what it is.”

She acted much calmer waddling along beside me.  It felt good helping a duck in distress!

We walked some distance.  So I thought it might be helpful if I sang a duck song.

I sang, hoping the music would calm her.

Little Ducky Wuddle

Went wading in a puddle,

Went wading in a puddle

Quite small.

Said she, “It doesn’t matter

How much I splash and splatter,

I’m only a ducky

After all.”

That seemed to calm her a little bit.

“Wow, you really liked that one didn’t you?” 

I’ll sing it again.  Wish you could sing it with me!”

No response, so…

I sang again,

Little Ducky Wuddle

Went wading in a puddle,

Went wading in a puddle

Quite small.

Said she, “It doesn’t matter

How much I splash and splatter,

I’m only ducky

After all.”

We were almost at the lake.  Obviously, she didn’t want to be there.  She became more and more nervous with each step we took.  She slowed her waddling.  It seemed as though she wanted to return to where we started.

At the edge of the water, I looked arountrees by the lake or flew in the sky.  Three geese splashed water at each other.  I couldn’t see anything that would be so upsetting to my friend, Ducky.

What is it? I asked her.  I don’t see anything unusual to upset you so.”

Just then, she began quacking loud and long, much louder than before!

Okay, Okay,” I said patiently. 

“I know you see or sense something, but I don’t see it yet.”

But she had seen the water move.  Now I saw a form moving toward us from the center of the lake.

“What is it?” I wondered.

“Could it be a Loch Ness monster?  Surely not here in our Florida lake!” 

These silent thoughts kept from alarming my friend Duck.

The clear water in the lake allowed me to see the object coming closer. 

An alligator!  No wonder Duck’s excitement reached fever pitch!

You’re right,” I stated.  “Alligators need to have our healthy respect.  I don’t want to be in water around them.   But, I also know they can be easily frightened.

Flap your wings and splash like those geese over there, that ole gator won’t bother you at all.”

Quack, quack, quack,” she honked.

I waved my arms, yelling and splashing water in the direction of the alligator.   He turned and started gliding toward the opposite shore!  Duck and I breathed a sigh of relief! 

She looked up at me with heavy ducky eyes and went, “Quack, quack.”

It sounded very much like “thank you” to me.

I smiled at her and said affectionately, “You’re very welcome, Duck.  Let me know if I can help you again.  I come here often. Maybe we’ll see each other soon.”

Another duck waddled toward us.  They seemed to know the each other and moved closer.  “My” duck kept looking back at me, as she quacked and quacked.

I know she told her friend the entire story, in duck language of course!

Authors Note:

This story gave me the idea for Glitzy Series, an adventurous rabbit who gets into more jams than a bowl full of jello.

They’ll be arriving soon!

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Personal Development Niche One

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Photo by Sound On on Pexels.com

Personal Development’s Many Faces and Hats Worn

My entire adult life I’ve lived with a Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis. Best known as MS it often goes badly for some of those afflicted with it.

Since MS affects everyone differently, then each person who has MS has their own disease.

I think most doctors say putting MS in a box would be too simple a statement. The disease holds too many mysteries, it’s complications and diversity are too complex.

My graduation from high school at 17 happened two months before I heard what some would call dreadful news. It had no effect on me at the time for I felt and looked fine.

As years went by and I grew older, more lesions developed on my spine and brain. That happens within MS; lesions, demyelination (where disease destroys and damages nerve coatings called myelin.)

Different neurologists have said that my MS is mild. A famous neuro in Minneapolis labeled it benign. The definition of benign is kind; MS treated me most unkind at times.

to be continued ~

Ghostwriting Has Many More Aspects Than Telling a Story. Claudia Suzanne, expert Ghostwriting teacher and writer of the only book on ghostwriting, has a seminar that listened to recently. I found it in The Freelance Writer’s Den. Carol Tice calls it a boot camp. Claudia explains everything from all the different types of ghostwriting forms; from memoir to novel, first draft to finished product, all the different publishing ways, and everything in between. The professional ghostwriter and a writer of books or freelance writer are different in many ways. Of course, similarities exist, but the differences are notable. Most notable is the fact that the writer must realize that they’re writing the author’s story and the ghostwriter isn’t the author. This is the most difficult aspect for some writers to wrap their heads around. Publishing creates a learning curve with which most bloggers and freelance writers aren’t familiar. Authors are on the other hand. They need to know all about publishing and marketing, unless they have a publicist or agent.

ghost writing

A Fascinating Duck

CHILDREN'S STORYBOOK

Fascinating Duck

Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

A Fascinating Duck

                              

By

JGKipp

What can be so fascinating about a duck?

A most interesting duck met me today!

She looked average, an every day, garden-variety duck.  She had a wide body; not fat, not skinny, looking just right to me.  She probably weighed ten to fifteen pounds. Shades of brown with green and white feathers around her long neck and a large head graced her body. All of this made her a very interesting duck.

She had to be a duck because I’d seen pictures of ducks and this duck looked identical to them.  At the zoo were many ducks, and my family had been there with me, as well.

It wasn’t too surprising to see her.  She was at the right place, where lots of ducks gather. 

You could be thinking, “Why are you telling me this?”

You also might wonder why I keep calling duck ‘she.’ Don’t know an answer to that, this duck just looked like a she. And…

She acted strangely, that’s why.  She kept looking back and forth toward the lake and me, while quacking wildly!

Hi there Duck,” I called cheerfully, with a wide grin on my face.  I thought it would make her happy if I looked happy.

Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack,” she quackily replied loudly!

You seem upset.  Are you all right? I asked.

“Quack, quack, quack, quack, quack, quack,” she responded.  Again, she kept looking at the lake and back to me.

Whatever’s wrong must be by or in the lake,” I thought.  “Come on, Duck, let’s go see what it is.”

She acted much calmer waddling along beside me.  It felt good helping a duck in distress!

We walked some distance.  So I thought it might be helpful if I sang a duck song.

I sang, hoping the music would calm her.

Little Ducky Wuddle

Went wading in a puddle,

Went wading in a puddle

Quite small.

Said she, “It doesn’t matter

How much I splash and splatter,

I’m only a ducky

After all.”

That seemed to calm her a little bit.

“Wow, you really liked that one didn’t you?” 

I’ll sing it again.  Wish you could sing it with me!”

No response, so…

I sang again,

Little Ducky Wuddle

Went wading in a puddle,

Went wading in a puddle

Quite small.

Said she, “It doesn’t matter

How much I splash and splatter,

I’m only ducky

After all.”

We were almost at the lake.  Obviously, she didn’t want to be there.  She became more and more nervous with each step we took.  She slowed her waddling.  It seemed as though she wanted to return to where we started.

At the edge of the water, I looked around trees by the lake or flew in the sky.  Three geese splashed water at each other.  I couldn’t see anything that would be so upsetting to my friend, Ducky.

What is it? I asked her.  I don’t see anything unusual to upset you so.”

Just then, she began quacking loud and long, much louder than before!

Okay, Okay,” I said patiently. 

“I know you see or sense something, but I don’t see it yet.”

But she had seen the water move.  Now I saw a form moving toward us from the center of the lake.

“What is it?” I wondered.

“Could it be a Loch Ness monster?  Surely not here in our Florida lake!” 

These silent thoughts kept from alarming my friend Duck.

The clear water in the lake allowed me to see the object coming closer. 

An alligator!  No wonder Duck’s excitement reached fever pitch!

You’re right,” I stated.  “Alligators need to have our healthy respect.  I don’t want to be in water around them.   But, I also know they can be easily frightened.

Flap your wings and splash like those geese over there, that ole gator won’t bother you at all.”

Quack, quack, quack,” she honked.

I waved my arms, yelling and splashing water in the direction of the alligator.   He turned and started gliding toward the opposite shore!  Duck and I breathed a sigh of relief! 

She looked up at me with heavy ducky eyes and went, “Quack, quack.”

It sounded very much like “thank you” to me.

I smiled at her and said affectionately, “You’re very welcome, Duck.  Let me know if I can help you again.  I come here often. Maybe we’ll see each other soon.”

Another duck waddled toward us.  They seemed to know the each other and moved closer.  “My” duck kept looking back at me, as she quacked and quacked.

I know she told her friend the entire story! 

Authors Note:

This story gave me the idea for Glitzy Series, an adventurous rabbit who gets into more jams than a bowl full of jello.

They’ll be arriving soon!

Education in the United States

Education

Education Can Be More Than Books

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Education

in the

United States

from Wikipedia

Education in the United States is provided in publicprivate, and home schools.

State governments set overall educational standards, often mandate standardized tests for K–12 public school systems and supervise, usually through a board of regents, state colleges, and universities. The bulk of the $1.3 trillion in funding comes from state and local governments, with federal funding accounting for only about $200 billion.[1] Private schools are generally free to determine their own curriculum and staffing policies, with voluntary accreditation available through independent regional accreditation authorities, although some state regulation can apply.

In 2013, about 87% of school-age children (those below higher education) attended state funded public schools, about 10% attended tuition- and foundation-funded private schools,[8] and roughly 3% were home-schooled.[9]

By state law, education is compulsory over an age range starting between five and eight and ending somewhere between ages sixteen and eighteen, depending on the state.[10] This requirement can be satisfied in public schools, state-certified private schools, or an approved home school program. In most schools, compulsory education is divided into three levels: elementary schoolmiddle or junior high school, and high school. Children are usually divided by age groups into grades, ranging from kindergarten (5–6-year olds) and first grade for the youngest children, up to twelfth grade (17–18 years old) as the final year of high school.

There are also a large number and wide variety of publicly and privately administered institutions of higher education throughout the country. Post-secondary education, divided into college, as the first tertiary degree, and graduate school, is described in a separate section below. Higher education includes elite private colleges like Harvard UniversityStanford UniversityMIT, and Caltech, large state flagship universities, private liberal arts schools, historically-black colleges and universities, community colleges, and for-profit colleges like the University of Phoenix. College enrollment rates in the United States have increased over the long term.[11] At the same time, student loan debt has also risen to $1.5 trillion. According to a report published by the U.S. News & World Report, of the top ten colleges and universities in the world, eight are American (the other two are Oxford and Cambridge, in the United Kingdom).[12]

The United States spends more per student on education than any other country.[13] In 2014, the Pearson/Economist Intelligence Unit rated US education as 14th best in the world. The Programme for International Student Assessment coordinated by the OECD currently ranks the overall knowledge and skills of American 15-year-olds as 31st in the world in reading literacy, mathematics, and science with the average American student scoring 487.7, compared with the OECD average of 493.[14][15] In 2014, the country spent 6.2 percent of its GDP on all levels of education – 1.0 percentage points above the OECD average of 5.2 percent.[16] In 2017, 46.4 percent of Americans aged 25 to 64 attained some form of post-secondary education.[3][4] 48 percent of Americans aged 25 to 34 attained some form of tertiary education, about 4 percent above the OECD average of 44 percent.[17][18][19] 35 percent of Americans aged 25 and over have achieved a bachelor’s degree or higher.[20] The United States ranks 3rd from the bottom among OECD nations in terms of its poverty gap, and 4th from the bottom in terms of poverty rate.[21][22] Jonathan Kozol has described these inequalities in K–12 education in Savage Inequalities and The Shame of a Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America.[23]

Clips

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Photo by Retha Ferguson on Pexels.com

Judith Norris

aka J. Gail Norris

Riverplace Navigator

“Meet Your Neighbor”

Column by J.Gail Norris

Riverplace, an office complex co-located with LaRive Condominium, held a series of offices, shops, and apartments. They published a monthly newsletter that ran my column, “Meet Your Neighbor.”

Mississippi Mud

The inhouse newsletter of LaRive Condominium editors Marvin and Pat Tromp asked me to help them with writing and editing the newsletter. I interviewed residents and wrote articles.

We lived in Minneapolis six years. I applied for teaching positions, substituted, and taught a night course. Finally, I landed a reading position. Meanwhile, this writing opportunity and teaching a few private piano students occupied my time.

North Star Review

Minnesota North Star Chapter

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Intimacy Workshops Rated Tops

by J. Gail Norris

Judigail’s Blog Origins

Judigail's Blog

Photo by Gerd Altmann on Pexels.com

Judigail’s Blog

First, how my name explained ties into Judigail’s Blog name.

Judith, that’s my first name. People usually want to call anyone named Judith, Judy. Since I prefer to be called Judith, I will accept the other if it’s spelled correctly. Like in…

Judi with an I, Not Judy with a Y. That’s the way my mother spelled it. I changed it, because my given first name Judith, which I love.

When shortened, taking off the “th,” Judith becomes Judi with an I on the end, not a Y. Mom adored Judy Garland, the beautiful and talented 1940’s singer/actress. That was why she named me Judy. So Judy I stayed.

Till I became Judi.

When I realized that Judith shortened should be Judi with an i, not Judy with a y. Removing the letters ‘th’ at the end of Judith, produced Judi, not Judy. I changed the spelling. My parents didn’t mind that I made the change. Or, at least they never said they did.

Then I married to a man whose last name began with hard G sound. At about the same time, I saw a gorgeous airline attendant they called ‘Gail.’

I thought, “Gail’s my middle name, think I’ll start using it. Not that I’ll EVER look like her, gorgeous blonde creature that she is.”

Alliterations, that is same first letters of words fascinate me. Gail Gilley, nice ring to it, I thought.

Another metamorphosis came about when my sweet North Carolinian friend called me Judigail. Now there’s an original winner!

Judigail’s Blog!

Full of loving diversity!

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Graduate, Jon Morrow’s Guest Blogging

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Jon Morrow, My Hero!

The past six months a whirlwind of writing activity swired around me. Starting with Guest Blogging in December 2018, a break from Guest Blogging to take Freelance Writing course in March 2019 kept me a busy gal. It’ll keep going for a long time! Busy is good.

Becoming a Guest Blogging Graduate filled my dreams since I started that course in December 2018. Jon presented a Black Book of Blogs during the course. I learned about Freelance Writing and Carol Tice, owner/writer of Make A Living Writing Blog.

Guest Blogging taught me many ways of writing; free writing, blogging, researching, freelancing, interviewing, just a few examples. Awesome Jon built a million dollar website in Smart Blogger. He lives in a wheelchair as a Muscular Dystrophy patient while moving only his mind and mouth.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) currently puts me into a wheelchair. However, I’m able to do many daily activities for myself. Working with a Doctorate Physical Therapist specialist with MS who agrees that walking unassisted again is in my near future.

Being a Freelance Writer has it all.

“That’s it for me,” I decided.

Carol Tice, owner of Make A Living Writing, presented “Get More Freelance Writing Jobs” course. That month long course in March convinced me that Freelance Writing would lead my future endeavors

Hooked on Freelance Writing

My new mantra!

An Underwood typewriter, perhaps?

Ghost Writing: Isn’t About What You See Here!

ghost writing

May I be your ghost? Ghostwriter, that is.

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Let me be your ghost!

Call on me when you need someone else to tell your story, type it, and get it published. I’ll be your ghost!

Ghostwriting has nothing to do with the characters above, or anything else associated with Halloween!

Don’t mean too shout at you with the capital letters, just wanted to get your complete attention.

Listening is my best quality.

I’m your gal, when you need someone to tell your story, type it, then get it published.

I’ll listen to you,

Gather all the facts,

Put together your momentos,

We’ll outline your story.

The outline is an important part of starting the story. Getting that done helps the writing process to flow much more easily. It also saves on the rewriting. We’ll have fewer times going back-and-forth editing.

Helping your writer with the outline may also trigger additional thoughts or memories in your story telling. After the outline, your writer starts working on the first draft. When you have the first draft in hand, read it carefully and make any corrections in the margins for your writer to add to the second draft. You and your writer will need to collaborate many times, so your finished product reads the way you envision it.